CALL 0161 723 2000 | Careers | Contact

Call Us
0161 723 2000

we are working until 5PM

How To Kill Japanese Knotweed?

Japanese knotweed is one of the most troublesome weeds in the world. The invasive plant has been known to impact entire gardens and cause thousands of pounds’ worth of damage to buildings, if it’s not eradicated early enough. Fully exterminating the weed has proved difficult due to the extensive rhizome network associated with the plant.

Japanese knotweed grows in most environments and can grow some 4cm per day, resulting in a dense infestation in only a couple of weeks. More so, it only takes a small fragment of rhizome for it to grow. It can be transported through soil importation, during construction or even by footwear. Fortunately, with consistent and persistent efforts Japanese knotweed can be eliminated.

Using Herbicides

Herbicides, including Glyphosate based products, are effective at eradicating this notorious plant. Glyphosate based herbicides are applied on the foliage of the weed using a sprayer after being mixed in a tank. The Glyphosate herbicide can also be injected into the stem.

It’s advisable to spray the Japanese knotweed through various stages of the plants development during the growing season. The infestation size, presence of watercourses and general public all have to be considered during herbicide selection.

Digging out Rhizomes

Rhizomes (the extensive network of underground roots) are very proactive in the spreading of Japanese knotweed. Therefore, excavating the rhizome fully and either disposing them to a licensed landfill facility or an alternative mechanical remediation strategy is one of the best ways of removing the plant. Ensure that all the pieces that have been removed whilst implementing a clean site policy to prevent cross contamination.

Clearance and Burning the Japanese Knotweed

Controlled burning can be used as means of disposing of the stem cuttings to improve aesthetics and to facilitate access to the infestations. However, it is important to ensure that the cuttings are completely dried out before being burned to prevent regrowth. Ideally these works should be undertaken within the winter period. Burning on-site should be done in a controlled way to avoid cross contamination.

Using MeshTech Removal Method

The MeshTech method is an eco-friendly means of controlling the spread of Japanese knotweed. Designed by Dr Eric Connelly and JKSL, the method does not use any chemicals, and therefore leaves the lowest possible on-site footprint where it is used. It is also useful in preserving soil fertility and controlling soil erosion, especially along river banks. MeshTech can be a preferred methodology over herbicide use because it ensures that the surrounding environment remains as unaffected as it can be, conserving animal and plant life.

Biological Control

Although still being tested out, the biological method is one of the environmentally-friendly methods of dealing with Japanese knotweed. JKSL closely follow the work of CABI (Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International) and DEFRA (The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs), who began the psyllid release programme in Spring 2010.A natural predator, the psyllids insect, has been discovered as a method of naturally keeping the plant under control. Biological control will not kill Japanese knotweed, but it is hoped it will slow the spread of the plant and make it more vulnerable to chemical control. If this method works, it will be a huge relief to landowners across the UK.

Conclusion

There are several methods that effectively control Japanese knotweed. Eliminating the weed often requires a multi-pronged approach by applying different methodologies. Often, hiring a professional service such as JKSL is the only way that you can be sure the weed and its roots have been completely eradicated.

What Next?

I believe I have a Japanese knotweed infestation.
How can I contact you?