GROWING
CONCERNS

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  • What are they called and where are they…? Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

    Fallopia japonica The presence of Fallopia japonica was recorded in most of the countries of mainland North, Central and Southern Europe (with the exception of Italy, Albania and European Turkey) in 1979. There are very few records from European Russia and the plant is generally absent from the Mediterranean region. It is now known to flourish in parts of Milan, Italy – with climatic influence playing a part in this growth. The plant is regarded as a pest in North and Central Europe and the USA – it also occurs in Canada, Australia and New Zealand – no records have ever been made for Africa or South or Central America.

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  • Father’s Day … Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

    The recent Invasive Non Native Specialists Association conference turned into a bit of a family day out. A picture of my dad opened the conference whilst Mr Podmore (Richards Dad from Japanese Knotweed Control) helped on their stand… and Conor’s dad manned the Invasive Weed company display.

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  • Why is it growing there…? Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

    In its native Japan, Fallopia japonica is a component of communities inhabiting extreme lava and ash sheets at high altitudes. In these situations F. japonica is a pioneer species facilitating the growth of other plant species. The plant also spreads into man-made habitats, pastures and roadsides where it is one of the most troublesome weeds in Japan.

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  • The Railway Knotweed Children Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

    Several years ago I found a strange looking plant on a site in Bolton near to the railway line, it looked like Japanese knotweed but also exhibited some of the characteristics of Polygonum baldschuanica (Russian vine - also known as the ‘mile a minute’).

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